• Kyoto Wakuden Kyoto Wakuden
  • Kyoto Wakuden Kyoto Wakuden
  • Kyoto Wakuden Kyoto Wakuden
  • Kyoto Wakuden Kyoto Wakuden

Kyoto Wakuden

TEL. 075-365-1000

JR Kyoto Isetan 11th floor,
Higashi-shiokoji-cho, Karasuma-dori and
Shiokoji Sagaru, Shimogyo-ku, Kyoto MAP

Lunch
11 am-3 pm (last reservation: 2:30 pm)
Courses at 2,750 yen,  4,400 yen, 6,500 yen, 9,500 yen
and 12,000 yen
Chef’s lunch courses at 15,000 yen, 20,000 yen

 

 

Dinner
5 pm-10 pm (last reservation: 8:30 pm)
Courses at 6,500 yen, 9,500 yen
and 12,000 yen
Chef’s dinner courses at 15,000 yen or 20,000 yen

 

 

We are closed on the same days as JR Kyoto Isetan

 

<Year-end and New-year Closures>
We close at 6pm on December 31 (last reservation:4pm)
Closed January 1

・Prices include consumption tax and service charges
・Reservations are kindly accepted via telephone  (We do not take reservations for the 2,750 yen and 4,400 yen lunch courses)
・Please note that closing time may change due to store maintenance

Kyoto Wakuden
  Arrows indicate direction of traffic.

 

by Train, Bus and Taxi
We are located in JR Kyoto Isetan department store, connected to JR Kyoto station

 

Parking
Parking is available in the JR parking lot
Please use the south elevator in JR Kyoto ISETAN when arriving after 8 pm

November November

Kyoto Wakuden

2019.11.14

November

November

Kyoto truly comes to life in November. Nature paints a vibrant canvas, with beautiful autumn trees bursting into color and falling into a carpet of crimson that covers the whole city. This month’s Kyoto Wakuden course features ebi-imo (literally, shrimp potato), a variety of taro, from Nishiitamochi in Tondabayashi. We also offer a crab course and the season’s last taste of matsutake mushrooms. We look forward to welcoming you.
Read more >

Kyoto truly comes to life in November. Nature paints a vibrant canvas, with beautiful autumn trees bursting into color and falling into a carpet of crimson that covers the whole city. This month’s Kyoto Wakuden course features ebi-imo (literally, shrimp potato), a variety of taro, from Nishiitamochi in Tondabayashi. We also offer a crab course and the season’s last taste of matsutake mushrooms. We look forward to welcoming you.
Read more >

September September

Kyoto Wakuden

2019.09.04

September

September

On the fifteenth night, when the air is clear, the moon is at its most beautiful. Shrines and temples hold moon viewing rites and banquets, and the time comes for the annual harvest festival—an important event for which we make offerings to the moon and thank the gods for a plentiful crop. We spend our days delighting in the harvest’s many fruits; we want to eat with the feeling of gratitude. At Wakuden this month, we await you with a bowl of soft-shelled turtle, sea bream steamed with soba seeds, and more.
Read more >

On the fifteenth night, when the air is clear, the moon is at its most beautiful. Shrines and temples hold moon viewing rites and banquets, and the time comes for the annual harvest festival—an important event for which we make offerings to the moon and thank the gods for a plentiful crop. We spend our days delighting in the harvest’s many fruits; we want to eat with the feeling of gratitude. At Wakuden this month, we await you with a bowl of soft-shelled turtle, sea bream steamed with soba seeds, and more.
Read more >

August August

Kyoto Wakuden

2019.08.04

August

August

The fierce heat continues. Local people are out on Kyoto’s streets trying to beat the heat by sprinkling water in front of their homes. August in Kyoto also means the Gozan no Okuribi, or Daimonji, a traditional Buddhist rite marking the end of the Obon festival. Five giant bonfires are lit on the mountains surrounding the city, and we press our hands together in prayer to send off the spirits of deceased family members. In the deep darkness that falls after the fires go out, we bid summer farewell and feel the first taste of autumn. This month at Wakuden you can enjoy such dishes as “conger eel and jade eggplant” and “fig with white miso bean paste.”
Read more >

The fierce heat continues. Local people are out on Kyoto’s streets trying to beat the heat by sprinkling water in front of their homes. August in Kyoto also means the Gozan no Okuribi, or Daimonji, a traditional Buddhist rite marking the end of the Obon festival. Five giant bonfires are lit on the mountains surrounding the city, and we press our hands together in prayer to send off the spirits of deceased family members. In the deep darkness that falls after the fires go out, we bid summer farewell and feel the first taste of autumn. This month at Wakuden you can enjoy such dishes as “conger eel and jade eggplant” and “fig with white miso bean paste.”
Read more >